Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard 100% Whey

Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard 100% Whey Protein is a high quality Bodybuilding and Sports Nutrition Supplement that provides the perfect Protein Powder for Bodybuilders and those looking to gain lean muscle mass at an effective rate. Each and every serving contains 120 calories and 24 grams of protein @ Dynamic Supplements

BSN Syntha 6 Edge

BSN Syntha-6 Edge is a synthesis of premium proteins to provide muscles with the nutritional support they require to maximise recovery and growth, and help you achieve results. Choose from a plethora of decadent flavours to reward your taste buds; you’ll be convinced it’s a cheat day each time you enjoy Syntha-6 Edge @ Dynamic Supplements

Medi-Evil Whey Fury

Whey Fury™ has a superior signature 83% protein content to aid in the body’s growth and repair. The Whey Fury™ signature blend consists of highly bio-available Hydrolysed whey protein, Whey protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, Soy isolate and milk protein concentrate. Medi-Evil® Whey Fury™ contains Medi-Evil®’s patented digestive aid compound Trigesteze® for rapid digestion. Whey Fury™ tastes great and mixes perfectly @ Dynamic Supplements

PhD Diet Whey 2kg

PhD Nutrition Diet Whey is a high Protein Powder, Bodybuilding and Sports Nutrition Supplement that is low in calories. With each serving you receive 193 calories and 35 grams of protein.

To ensure lean muscle gains and fantastic fat free conditions, there is no other protein powder supplement on the market that can compete with PhD Nutrition Diet Whey. It contains a blend of slow release proteins that will satiate you and regulate your appetite, preventing energy crashes throughout each day @ Dynamic Supplements

Does the protien diet work?

Of course, when it comes to healthy eating, there are plenty of alternative diets that people want to claim are healthier than the traditional calorie counting method. They are usually motivated by a desire to sell a book or a food range, but some people swear by these methods.

The most famous diet lately has been the Atkins diet and its many copycats: the South Beach diet, GI, and the rest. These are basically high-protein diets that tell you carbohydrate (‘carbs’) are evil, and you should cut right down on them or even cut them out of your diet completely. While nutritionists are incredulous that anyone would seriously consider cutting an entire food group out of their diets, the books have sold in the millions.

The dirty little secret of protein diets is that they do help you lose weight, but only in the short term. They do this by causing you to give yourself a disease called ketosis, caused by lack of carbohydrate, that makes you lose weight, feel bad and have terrible breath. As soon as you go off the diet and back to your old ways, however, you will simply put all your weight back on again.

It is a similar situation with many other diets, including weight loss milkshakes, which rarely contain anything resembling a balanced meal. Instead, they flood your body with protein and little else, forcing it to burn fat – but again, the effect quickly wears off if you stop using the shakes.

A cynic might say that they’re not really trying to help you lose weight or eat healthily, so much as they are trying to keep you on their dodgy diets forever. If you want to eat healthily, stick to balance – no matter what anyone tells you, that’s never going to change.

Can You Have Too Much Protein Supplement?

Protein is a hot topic on the Internet and in the Gym. It is a topic that is widely discussed and debated among bodybuilders, nutritionists, and doctors. There are those who say that you can’t get enough protein, while there are others who claim that you actually can get too much protein. But can you really have too much of a protein supplement?

You actually can have too much protein. Unfortunately, the body does not store protein. Instead, it turns the protein to fat, and then stores the fat. When fat is stored, you become overweight, and that physique that you were shooting for will fly out of the window. This, however, is the least of your problems if you are taking in too much protein regularly.

An overdose of protein can lead to ketosis. Ketosis means that there are too many ketones in the blood stream. This, in turn, can cause damage to the kidneys. Dehydration is also a result of too much protein. So, as you can see, very serious health problems can occur when you take in too much protein, or too much of a protein supplement. The weight gain that you will experience will be the least of your problems.

So, how much protein do you need? How can you be sure that you aren’t over doing it? As an athlete, you need .6 to .8 grams of protein for each pound of body weight. Many bodybuilders, however, take in about one gram of protein for each pound of body weight, and most do not have any problems with this. This is very common for strength trainers.

The protein that you take in can come directly from food, or from protein supplements, however, a combination of solid foods and liquid protein supplements is recommended. In the case of replacing food with protein supplements, you can also have too much of the protein supplement, regardless of how much or how little protein you are actually taking in.

You see, your body needs solids and liquids. It is true that liquid protein is easier for the body to absorb, which is why a liquid protein supplement is recommended immediately after working out. However, your body needs to go through the act of digesting food, and it works harder at digesting protein, which in turn burns more calories. Again, you need a combination of solid foods, and liquid protein supplements.

Again, bodybuilders do need more protein than sedentary people, and even more than some other types of athletes. However, remember the ‘all things in moderation’ rule, and understand that taking in more protein supplement than you actually need to reach your goals will not actually get you anywhere near your goals. Instead, it will leave you overweight, and in poor health.

Beware of Eating Too much Protein

Protein is an essential nutrient, and is vital to your health. It is used to build muscles, skin, hair and nails. However, many people put their health at risk by eating too much protein.
The typical American diet already provides plenty of protein and there is no point in adding any more, unlike fat cells, there is no place in the body to store protein so the excess is eliminated or is seen as fat rather than muscle.

So what you need to do is to consume just enough protein to allow your muscles to be healthy, perform work and grow. But how much is just enough?

You only use protein for about 15% of your energy use, the majority of energy comes from fats and carbohydrates. Exercising doesn’t necessarily mean that you require more protein but more carbohydrates to stop your body breaking down protein and using that for energy.

Try to make sure that 70% of your protein comes from sources such as meat, fish, eggs or poultry. The complete protein provided by these foods combines with incomplete protein consumed from other food sources. So your body makes the best of all the protein that you consume.

If you are consuming too much protein, you are probably consuming too many calories over your maintenance levels and this will show as an increase in your body fat levels. And with the advent of the latest fad high protein diets, not enough carbohydrates are being consumed so the protein is converted to glucose and not converted into muscle growth.

What is needed for muscle growth is not more protein but high intensity strength training with the required amount of time for rest and recovery between sessions. Because that major bodybuilding star you saw in the latest magazine requires 300 grams of protein a day doesn’t mean that you have to. What he won’t tell you is that taking Steroids is behind his muscle gains and not his diet.
High intensity strength training and not food stimulates muscle growth.

Consuming excessive amounts of protein is not only bad for your liver and kidneys but also promotes vitamin and mineral deficiencies. It is also linked to osteoporosis and some forms of cancer.
One way to overcome the need to eat large quantities of protein is to increase the consumption of protein in stages until a maximum efficiency point is reached and then to drastically reduce it again. This obliges the body to over-compensate by increasing the efficiency for the absorption of protein into the body.

An example of a Protein Loading diet is found below.

Week One

Breakfast: Poached egg on toast, cereal with fruit and milk.

Snack: Fruit and protein shake.

Lunch: Chicken, potato, and vegetables. Fresh fruit salad.

Snack: Nuts, fruit, and biscuits with cheese.

Dinner: Fish any style, rice, vegetables, whole meal bread and fruit salad.

Week Two

Breakfast: Two poached eggs on toast, cereal with fruit salad and milk.

Snack: Nuts, fruit, protein shake.

Lunch: Chicken with potatoes and vegetables (any style)

Snack: Nuts, fruit, biscuits with cheese.

Dinner: Roast Beef with vegetables, brown rice, whole meal bread.

Week Three

Breakfast: Three eggs any style on toast, cereal with fruit and milk.

Snack: Nuts, fruit, and protein shake.

Lunch: Turkey with potatoes and vegetables, brown rice, whole meal bread.

Snack: Nuts, fruit, protein shake.

Dinner: ½ Chicken, potatoes, veggies, brown rice, whole meal bread.

Before Bed: Protein shake.

Week Four

Breakfast: Four eggs any style on toast, cereal with fruit and milk.

Snack: Nuts, fruit, protein shake.

Lunch: Spaghetti with meat sauce, potatoes, brown rice, whole meal bread.

Snack: Nuts, fruit, protein shake.

Dinner: Roast Pork, potatoes, brown rice, whole meal bread.

Before Bed: Protein shake.

After week four of this protein loading diet, move from the max intake of protein to the lowest. So in the fifth week go back to week one menu, in the sixth week, week two menu and so on.

This protein loading diet provides a balance of protein, fats and carbohydrates and combined with high intensity strength training will be very effective in increasing muscular bodyweight without the need to ingest large quantities of protein.

Benefits of Whey Protein

In recent years, the subject of whey protein has come up often in health discussions. Know what whey protein is, its possible benefits and side effects and more as you read on.

What is Whey Protein
Whey protein is actually a term used to describe a group of globular proteins that can be separated from whey. When cow’s milk is used to manufacture cheese, it also leads to the production of whey, which may or may not be discarded. It is a mixture of lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin and serum albumin.

Similar to protein found in egg white, whey protein can also be irreversibly changed by heat. When made part of the pasteurization process, it becomes less bio-active. If not, whey protein naturally becomes bio-active which basically means it contains a high concentration of cysteine and consequently glutathione, an antioxidant that is essential to improved fitness and health.
Bio-active whey protein is an active source for protein but exposure to extreme heat can easily reduce the amount of cysteine in it without affecting its protein content and basic food value.

Native whey protein
What Makes It Good for the Body

Because whey protein contains an inordinate amount of essential and non-essential acids, it frequently plays a prominent role in most low-carb and high-protein diets. Another reason for this is because of its low content of fats and of course, carbohydrates.

Why Pregnant Mothers Love Whey Protein
A number of OBs have advised their gravid patients to increase their intake of whey protein because it will provide the basic amount of amino acids needed by the growing infants inside their bodies. An increased intake of whey protein will naturally improve and speed up the development of the baby. Also, increased intake of whey protein will indirectly improve the immune system of the baby. In its growing stages, it is highly vulnerable to different types of illnesses. With the help of whey protein, it grow faster and better and more equipped to defend itself against any health complication.

Whey Protein for Bodybuilding Enthusiasts
For bodybuilders, muscle growth is everything and that’s why they love whey protein so much. Studies have satisfactorily proven that whey protein can lead to acceleration of muscle development. This is welcomed news especially for bodybuilders who are only a few weeks away from the date of competition but is still in high need of muscle growth.

How it Helps Athletes Busy Recovering from Old Injuries
In this case, whey protein saves the day once more because it can be used to supplement diets of individuals who are suffering from compromised immune systems. Basically, it helps athletes heal faster and feel better.

A Weapon against Degenerative Diseases
Although you can’t truly say that any disease is less painful than the other if both have life-altering consequences, it is an inarguable fact however that degenerative diseases are one of the worst health complications to suffer from. These illnesses tend to subject people to a protracted form of suffering and with symptoms with increasing levels of severity. They commonly affect three systems in particular: the nervous system, the muscular system and the skeletal system.

Although rarely curable, degenerative diseases can be treated through chemotherapy, surgical operations and the proper diet. Whey protein is often a part of this diet because of its rehabilitative benefits especially when it comes to muscle growth. Cancer, diabetes and AIDS have symptoms that causes muscle strength and growth to deteriorate – an undesirable effect that can be combated with increased intake of whey protein.

Where to Buy Whey Protein
Are you sufficiently convinced of the benefits of whey protein then? If so, you should be happy to know that you can avail of commercial whey protein product in most supermarkets and specialty food stores specializing in healthy food.

Ending with a Warning
Whey protein is good for the body – no doubt about it – but too much consumption of anything is never beneficial. Too much intake of whey protein can lead to unnecessary complications of your liver. And need we remind you that the liver is the next most important organ in the body? Lastly, lactose intolerant individuals must consume whey protein isolate rather than the normal variety as the former has less lactose content.

All About Protein

Proteins are very important to our bodies. It isn’t just for bodybuilders who use them to gain muscle mass. Those who are sick use them to rebuild damaged tissue and even in normal states, our body uses protein for many different tasks.

Proteins are made of amino acids that are folded together. There are essential amino acids – those that our body cannot make, and non essential amino acids – those that our body can make. Proteins that are made up of all the essential amino acids are said to be complete while those that lack in one or more essential amino acid are incomplete. Complete proteins come from sources such as meat, eggs, cheese, dairy and soy. Incomplete proteins come mainly from vegetable sources with the one exception being soy.

The ideal source should be complete proteins. For most people that isn’t a problem. If you are worried about fat intake, try lean cuts of beef, chicken and turkey. For vegetarians whose main source comes from incomplete proteins, getting a variety of vegetables and whole grains throughout the day will ensure that all essential amino acids are consumed. Also, using soy protein (which is the only complete vegetable source of protein) is very beneficial.

4 Important Facts You Should Know About Whey Protein

Are you concerned about taking care of your body before and after strenuous activities or workouts? Do you try to avoid supplements that contain additives and possible side effects?
If you are interested in better health and improved physical fitness you have surely heard that bodybuilders and other athletes are turning to a simple, natural supplement called whey protein.

WHY DO ATHLETES USE WHEY PROTEIN?

Protein levels are depleted through exercise. Muscles require amino acids to prevent deterioration, give endurance and build mass. Proteins supply these amino acids to the muscles which is why athletes use whey protein.

WHAT IS WHEY PROTEIN?

Commercial whey protein comes from cow’s milk. Whey is the by-product of making cheese and was usually thrown away as a waste product. Now researchers know that whey protein is high quality, natural protein that is rich with amino acids essential for good health and muscle building. It is naturally found in mother’s milk and also used in baby formula. It is being considered for use as a fortifier of grain products because of its considerable health benefits and bland flavor.

Although protein is also found in other foods such as meat, soy and vegetables, whey protein is proven to have the highest absorption (digestion) levels in comparison to all others.

WHO SHOULD CONSIDER USING WHEY PROTEIN?

Whey protein has many health benefits including immune support, bone health, sports health, weight management and overall well being.

Because amino acids are ‘building blocks’ for the human body it is sometimes used by patients to speed up the healing of wounds or burns.

The high quality protein that comes from whey makes it a recommended choice for those who need optimal benefits from restricted diets including diabetics, those on weight management diets and even ill patients not able to consume enough protein in their diet to assist with healing.

CAN WHEY PROTEIN BE DANGEROUS?

Whey protein is a food and so it does not have have the risks associated with other supplements. That said, too much of anything carries risks. Extremely high use of whey protein can overload the liver which can cause serious problems. Moderation is always recommended.

If you are lactose intolerant you might try whey protein isolate which has less than 1% lactose and should be tolerable for most users.

Whey protein is a natural and healthy way to bring protein into your diet and increase well being.

The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and is not intended to medically diagnose, treat or cure any disease. Consult a health care practitioner before beginning any health care program.

Author: Hamoon Arbabi
Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/health/article_1956.shtml