Eating the Right Food

Eating the Right Food and Maintaining Good Eating Habits is Essential to Enjoying Proper Nutrition on the Road:

How many times have you been on a business trip and just been too busy to have a proper lunch? With today’s fast-paced lifestyle, it is important to follow these essential guidelines to proper nutrition and good eating habits on the road.

When selecting meat, poultry, dry beans, and milk or milk products, make choices that are lean, low-fat or fat-free.

Eating the right food means consuming a sufficient amount of fruits and vegetables. Select from all five vegetable subgroups (dark green, orange, legumes, starchy vegetables and other vegetables) several times a week.

Consume three or more ounce-equivalents of whole-grain products per day. In general, at least half the grains should come from whole grains.

As part of your good eating habits during your travels, consume three cups per day of fat-free or low-fat milk or equivalent milk products.

Consume less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fatty acids and less than 300 mg/day of cholesterol, and keep trans-fatty acid consumption as low as possible.

Keep total fat intake between 20 to 35 percent of calories.

For those long trips, choose beverages with little added sugars or caloric sweeteners.

Most importantly, eating the right food on the road should not jeopardize your safety or that of other drives. Do not drive and eat at the same time, since you lose track of the type and quantities of food you are consuming as well as distracting you from your driving.

Remember that proper nutrition can make the difference between feeling great and feeling just okay—especially when traveling. Proper nutrition is easy to maintain, even on the road. In fact, all you need to do to ensure your health and well being is to follow the simple steps, outlined above.

Eating Out, Mexican Style

With the fast pace and competitiveness of American society, dining out is a way of life for many people. Americans eat out an average of three to four meals a week. Unfortunately, in many cases, restaurant food often contains a lot of fat, sugar and sodium for taste and preservative value. It is possible, however, to eat healthy and choose wisely if you’re skilled at special ordering and knowledgeable about food preparation for different cuisines.

Tips:

Hold or limit guacamole and sour cream. Two tablespoons of guacamole has about 50 calories and four grams of fat (72 percent fat) and two tablespoons of sour cream have 45 calories and five grams of fat (100 percent fat).

Hold or limit the chips. A typical basket of chips contains 1,040 calories and 43 percent fat.

Hold the cheese or get it on the side. A one-inch cube of cheese has about 100 calories and eight grams of fat (75-percent fat).

Skip or limit the chile con queso dip. One cup has about 529 calories and 31 grams of fat (53 percent fat).

Drink light beer or a wine spritzer instead of a margarita (90-100 calories versus 250 calories for the margarita).

Split orders and take home half in a doggie bag. Share the praline or sopapilla, if you must indulge.

Be aware of: tortilla shells, chorizo (Mexican sausage), deep-fried, refried beans, “served over chips, stuffed or covered with cheese or bacon,” cheese sauce, queso, guacamole, sour cream, sauces (con queso).

Go for: flour tortillas (2-3 grams fat), corn tortillas (1 gram fat), soft tacos, marinated, simmered, grilled chicken, shrimp, fish, pinto beans, Mexican rice, black beans, hot peppers, served with salsa, covered with enchilada sauce, salsa verde with tomato, lettuce, onion, mole, tomato.