Fruits and Vegetables are a Healthy Choice

Most people know that eating fruits and vegetable are good for your health. Yet many people still don’t eat enough of fruits and vegetables. Experts say that everyone should get at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Increasing your vegetable and fruit intake will boost your health, you can also lose weight.

You might think 5 serving or even 9 serving is a lot to ask for. But you should still try your best to achieve the goal because after all you are doing if for yourself and your loved ones. Here is list of things you can eat for 1 serving to help you out.

A medium fruit or vegetable, for example an orange, apple or banana will be one serving. So will two small fruits, such as kiwi or plums. ½ cup of fresh, frozen or canned fruits and vegetables. ½ cup of 100% juice will do the trick as well. And other options could be ¼ cup of dried fruit or a cup of green salad. These are ides that will get you started.

Many studies have proven that a diet full of fruits and vegetables can lower the risk of some cancers, heart disease and other chronic diseases and conditions.

Antioxidant vitamins can be found in many fruits and vegetables, such as vitamin A, vitamin E and vitamin C. Not only that, but fruits are also a source of dietary fibre.

Many people may not know but not only do citrus fruits like oranges and grapefruits have a great source of vitamin C, they are also a good source for fibre.

The list goes on and on for the benefits of eating more fruits and vegetables. The bottom line is to just try and add fruits and vegetables to your diet if you haven’t already. And if you have, to keep eating them and eat as much of them as you can.

Five Healthy Weight Loss Tips

Are you tired of getting the same old advice when it comes to dieting? Are you looking for some quick tips to help motivate yourself during a diet? Why not follow along below to learn about some quick healthy weight loss tips?

Tip # 1: Take off five pounds quickly before a big event

If you’re generally in good shape, but you want to pare off a few
pounds to look your best before a big event like a class reunion, one of the best ways to do it is to cleanse your system. For the week before, skip the breads and pastas, eat lots of raw vegetables and salads, and drink at least eight ounce glasses of water a day. You’ll not only end up slimmer, you’ll feel 100% more energetic and healthy.

Tip # 2: Lose weight without dieting

It’s a lot easier than you think. The key is exercise. Just one half hour of moderate exercise per day will burn calories – and better yet, kick your metabolism into high gear so that you continue burning calories at a higher rate. Bonuses: you’ll be doing your health a favor, too. The latest research shows that adding moderate exercise to your daily routine can help lower cholesterol, slow the progression of type-2 diabetes and improve your circulation. What’s moderate exercise? A brisk one mile walk, half an hour of dancing, or chasing the kids around in a game of tag will do it.

Tip # 3: Start your day off right

Don’t skip breakfast when you’re dieting, and don’t go for the convenience of a ‘nutrition bar’. Give your body the pick-me-up of fresh fruit in either juice or raw form, and the staying power of a whole grain. One of the best breakfasts you can have is a bowl of whole-grain cereal with fresh berries, melon or peaches. You get
the sugar your body craves, the carbs it needs to run on, and the added
benefit of antioxidant vitamins to help it stay on track and balanced.

Tip # 4: Take a high quality multivitamin every day.

There’s no substitute for a diet that has a healthy balance of all foods, but it’s far too easy to skimp on the essentials when you’re dieting. Make sure that your body doesn’t miss out on the nutrients it needs just because you’re cutting calories. A good multivitamin should contain, at a minimum, the minimum recommended daily allowances of vitamins A, B6, B12, C, E and K. While you’re at it, get out in the sun for at least ten minutes a day to help your body manufacture the vitamin D that it needs.

Tip # 5: Eat your veggies – especially your lettuce.

But don’t confine yourself to iceberg lettuce or to salads. Darker greens have about the same number of calories and carbs, but pack a lot more punch in the vitamins and other nutrient categories. By substituting radicchio, watercress, escarole or spinach for the iceberg lettuce, you add vitamin C, riboflavin’s, manganese and other essential vitamins that aren’t present in lettuce. Try them braised, steamed or grilled for something a little different from the usual salad.

Eight Weight Loss Tips

There are a lot of “crash” diets out there that promise that you’ll drop a considerable amount of weight in days or a week. I have tried a few of these, and in my experience the weight always comes back on, just as quickly.

One thing you don’t want to do if you are actually serious about losing weight is to follow these fad diets. After their ineffectiveness has been proven time and again, people will start to wise up to that particular diet, and will head off in search of a new craze.

Lets be honest, people want to lose weight and they want immediate results, but this is just wishful thinking. To lose weight permanently and effectively it will be a rather slow progress, all depending on your metabolic rate and how much you need to lose.

There are however some proven tried and true methods for aiding in the weight loss process, and I can make you familiar with them.

1. Don’t skip breakfast. Whatever you do follow this advice, because otherwise you are much more likely in fact prone to binge later in the day.
2. Don’t eat anything for at least an hour before going to bed.
3. Don’t snack while watching TV. It’s acceptable to eat a meal while watching television, but never is snacking at this time acceptable.
4. Substitute fruits like; bananas, watermelon, plums, peaches, and oranges for sugary treats like; cookies and candy.
5. Substitute honey for sugar, and carob powder for chocolate in all recipes.
6. Eat more vegetables. This can even be enjoyable if you have a good cookbook like Good housekeeping’s latest edition.
7. Avoid unnecessary high calorie foods.
8. Exercise at least a half hour each day for 5 days out of the week.

Author: Beth Scott
Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/health/article_671.shtml

Eat Hot Peppers to Burn Extra Calories

Dieters Get Boost From Hot Pepper-Like Compound in Study

Adding some spicy hot peppers to a healthy meal isn’t a magic bullet, but it may help you burn a few extra calories and a bit more fat, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of California Los Angeles tested a compound related to the capsaicin found in hot peppers to see if it could give dieters a boost. It’s called dihydrocapsiate or DCT, and it’s not spicy hot like jalapenos.

They wanted to see if the pepper-like compound, by heating up the body, could translate to better calorie and fat burning.

“DCT caused an increase in calories burned after a test meal,” study author David Heber, MD, PhD, founding director of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition, tells WebMD. The boost, however, was modest — translating to about 100 extra calories a day for a 110-pound woman and 200 extra calories for a 200-pound man, he says. Fat burning was up a bit, too.

The findings were presented Tuesday at EB2010, the annual Experimental Biology meeting here.

This latest research follows other studies finding hot peppers may boost metabolism or dampen appetite.
Peppers for Weight Loss Study

Although DCT is structurally related to capsaicin from hot peppers, it doesn’t give that “bite,” says Amy Lee, MD, a research fellow at UCLA who presented the findings at the meeting.

The researchers started with 51 men and women but finished with 33, after accounting for dropouts, Lee says. All were obese and on a liquid meal replacement regimen that had just 800 calories daily. The low-calorie allotment was a primary reason for dropping out, she says.

Dieters were randomly assigned to take either a placebo capsule or DCT in a 3 milligram or 9 milligram dose, without knowing which they were taking.

At the start of the study, and four weeks later, the researchers measured the dieters’ metabolic rate and their energy expenditure (or heat production) after a test meal of 400 liquid calories.

People on the 9 milligram capsule had an increase in energy expenditure or heat production and increased fat burning, compared to those taking placebo, Lee says.

Peppers for Weight Loss: Second Opinion

”It needs further study as far as a potential weight loss product,” says Lauri Byerley, PhD, RD, an associate professor of research at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, who reviewed the study results for WebMD.

She points out, too, that people in the UCLA study were very obese, and on a very low-calorie, liquid diet supervised by health care professionals.

So the results could differ for people dieting by cutting back on portions or fat, for instance.

People on liquid diets typically experience rapid weight loss, partly because they have so much to lose, so dieters who expect slower weight loss may not benefit as much from the DCT, she says.

“We can’t conclude yet whether this approach would help people seeking slower weight loss, because they have less to lose,” Byerly tells WebMD.

Even so, she agrees with Heber that piling on the peppers can’t hurt. “[But] it’s got to be someone who likes the spice,” Byerly says.
Advice for Dieters

The type of DCT used in the study isn’t available on the market, Heber says.

But someone who wants to get a potential DCT-like boost could add chili spices to their dishes, he says.

As a way to burn calories, he says, it’s not a primary strategy but an add-on. “I would put it in the same category as green tea and caffeine,” Heber says.

Still, he sees no downside. The DCT, he says, “is not absorbed into the body. It doesn’t get out of the gut.”

Start your diet with your grocery store list

If you have healthy munchies in the house, it is so much easier to maintain a healthy diet. When you are very hungry, you will reach for the wrong foods. I find that if I keep and abundance of fresh green veggies in the refrigerator, it is easier to whip up a fast meal or create healthy food to crunch until I am ready to fix the next meal.

I am looking to lose weight and eat healthier. Many people can easily lose weight and healthier by eating fruits and vegetables each day. For most people you can easily lose a few pounds a month by just cutting out processed foods and eating fresh fruits and vegetables instead.

You can lose weight, and enrich your body with plenty of vitamins and nutrients by eating fresh fruits and vegetables. Fresh fruits are an excellent source of energy. Although they contain sugar, they are different than processed snack and are perfect when you are experiencing low energy during the middle of the day or during your workout.

If you are looking for great vitamins and minerals that can significantly cut your chances of cancer and other serious ailments, nothing is better than fresh vegetables. Make sure you consume plenty of leafy greens such as broccoli, spinach and Brussels sprouts. Carrots are also a great source of energy and are filled with vitamins for your eyes and skin. Most people enjoy salad, but make sure you load up on vegetables and not high fat dressing. A salad is a great way to get your daily fill of vegetables during the day. Snacks such as apples or carrot sticks are also great and won’t add lots of weight to your figure. So if you want to lose weight and eat healthier nothing is better than fruits and vegetables.

Before changing your lifestyle habits, contact your physician for medical advice

Dieting Is Out; Healthy Eating Is In

How giving up diets could help you succeed in weight loss.

After years of obsessing about weight loss, first shunning high-fat foods and then high-carb ones, it seems Americans are giving up formal diets in favor of healthy eating and wholesome foods.

A recent report by the market research firm NPD, based on a survey of 5,000 people, found that the number of Americans on weight loss diets was at its lowest rate in decades. As of February 2008, 26% of women and 16% of men surveyed said they were following a weight-loss diet, down from 39% of women and 29% of men in 1990.

At the same time, a 2008 American Dietetic Association survey of nearly 800 adults found that 79% said they aren’t doing more to improve their diets because they’re already satisfied with the way they eat; 73% said it’s because they don’t want to give up their favorite foods.

The good news? They don’t have to, say the experts.

“All foods can fit into a healthy diet, as long as you exercise and practice moderation,” says Jeannie Gazzaniga Moloo, PhD, RD,a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.
Healthy Eating vs. Dieting

So why are fewer people going on weight loss diets? One reason, some experts say, may be that they have learned from past mistakes.

Diet books, low-calorie, fat-free, and sugar-free foods abound, but don’t appear to be making a dent in obesity statistics. Many dieters have been lured over and over again by promises of fast weight loss from the latest diet schemes, only to regain the lost weight — and then some — as soon as they go off the diet.

The truth is that if your weight loss plan is not sustainable for the long term, it’s not worth following, says Michael Dansinger, MD, physician for the NBC reality show The Biggest Loser.

Another reason, say other experts, may simply be that dieters are waiting for the next diet craze – the Atkins Diet or South Beach Diet of the moment.

There’s no single, super-popular diet right now, says Cindy Moore, MS, RD, nutrition director for the Cleveland Clinic. “Even when the hot diet bursts onto the scene, just reading it is no guarantee you will lose weight,” she adds.

Still another reason, some say, is that, with two out of three Americans overweight, overweight is fast becoming the new “normal.” When your friends and family are overweight, your own extra pounds can seem less important.

Indeed, a 2007 study in The New England Journal of Medicine found that people tend to follow suit when their friends and family members become overweight, and likewise when they lose weight.
Better Food, Not More

Trends like the “slow food” movement, an interest in organic foods and in eating foods grown closer to home (being a “locavore”) are further shifting the momentum away from foods to avoid to foods to enjoy.

“If you shop at farmers markets, you are going to be buying natural food, not junk food,” says Moore.

K. Dunn Gifford, president of the Oldways Preservation Trust, a food issues think tank, says high-quality food is just more satisfying.

“We need to reduce our tendency toward over abundance and realize less food can be more satisfying when you choose foods with intense flavors and taste,” Gifford says.

It can be a lot easier and more motivating to focus on what you can eat instead of what you should avoid, experts say.

A study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2007 reported that obese women who avoided high-fat foods and focused on eating more fruits and vegetables lost 20% more weight that those who only avoided high-fat foods.

So what exactly should you be adding to your diet? Go for more plant foods and whole, unprocessed foods that are rich in nutrients and naturally lower in fat, salt, and sugar, experts say.

Nancy Rodriguez, PhD, RD, a nutrition researcher at the University of Connecticut, says eating lean or low-fat protein at every meal will fill you up and make you less likely to overeat. Likewise, foods like whole grains, fruits, and vegetables — high in fiber and water content — are low in calories and help you feel full.

“When you fill up on nutrient-rich fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, low-fat dairy, and other lean protein, there is less room for empty-calorie foods,” Rodriguez says.

And what about those foods that taste good but aren’t exactly packed with nutrients (except maybe calories)?

“It’s OK to enjoy a small serving of those foods once in a while,” says American Dietetic Association president Martin Yadrick, MA, RD.
Healthy Eating: Slow Down

Not only what you eat, but how you eat, is important when you’re trying to eat healthfully and lose extra pounds, experts say.

One big step toward taking control of your diet is to eat more home-cooked meals.

“When you prepare it, you have total control over what is in the food, you can make it exactly how you like it, and better for you than in restaurants, where you have no idea what is in the food,” says Ellie Krieger, RD, host of the Food Network’s Healthy Appetite and author of The Food You Crave.

Also, forget about eating on the run. You’ll enjoy your food more and ultimately, eat less, if you eat slowly and savor the flavors, Rodriguez says. Enjoy the conversation at the table, and give your brain time to get the signal that you are comfortably full.

“If you sit down and taste the food, you are more likely to be satisfied with less,” she says.

Dieters Need More Calcium

Women on diets need more calcium than normal to avoid bone loss, say Rutgers University researchers.

Studies showed a weight loss diet of 1.5 pounds a week for 6 weeks cuts absorption of calcium. In 57 postmenopausal dieters it was discovered that those women who took 1,800 mg of calcium a day absorbed 78 percent more calcium than those who took only 1,000 mg a day. To prevent bone loss, women dieting after menopause should get 1,700 mg of calcium a day, the experts say.

For people on low-fat, high fiber diets calcium requirements are also higher. Studies show that 19 percent less calcium is absorbed. It is theorized that the healthier diet moves food faster through the gastrointestinal tract.

While it is common knowledge that calcium is necessary for bone-growth research shows that calcium also fights fat absorption. Studies reveal that calcium blocks fat storage in fat cells. A minimum of 1,000 mg. of calcium daily improves total cholesterol and good HDL, but lowers bad LDL.

Despite the publicity of the importance of calcium for healthy bones research shows that consumption has gone down over the past 30 years.

Experts recommend 1,000 mg of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D daily for people under 50, and 1,500 mg of calcium and 800 IU of vitamin D for those over 50. The safe upper limit for calcium intake has been set at 2,500 mg a day. Experts think going above that on a daily basis may invite kidney stone formation.

Once started, never stop taking calcium/vitamin D supplements daily. USDA researchers found that after a 3- year study over one-third of participants stopped taking the supplements. Within one year women lost all bone-density gains and men lost their gains in two years.

For those who are lactose intolerant calcium and vitamin D supplementation is even more important because it will be difficult to get the daily requirement through diet alone.

For those allergic to cow’s milk. Drink enough soy milk to give you 500 mg of calcium per glass as compared to 300 mg in cows milk. Studies at Creighton University in Omaha, NE, showed that 25 percent less calcium is absorbed from soy milk as cows milk.

For more information on calcium and coral calcium: http://www.apluswriting.net/diettips/evitaminscalcium.htm

Dieters: When Moderation Doesn’t Work

If there’s one habit which will make you lose weight more than any other it’s reducing the amount you eat by eating only when you are hungry and stopping when you are satisfied rather than stuffed.

You can usually lose weight with this habit no matter what type of foods you eat – because we are generally eating far too much of everything these days.

The temptation to eat too much is everywhere. Standard portion sizes have grown out of all proportion to our needs so that the mini muffins of today were the standard size of a few years ago. A “tall” coffee is the smallest size you can get. Snack foods come in multi-packs and jumbo bars. We get mounds of food served up to us in restaurants and we are generally serving bigger portions at home too. You simply get used to indulging in an amount of food you can do without.

Most people can pick up on the portion size idea and reduce their normal intake when they want to lose weight. They relish being able to eat the foods they like, even if they are not eating so much of it. They use a bowl, take a handful of tortilla chips out of the bag and put the rest away. They leave half a muffin on the plate (better in the trash than on their hips) and they reduce the pile of food on their plate. They order less in restaurants and leave what they don’t need without a qualm.

This is great to avoid a feeling of deprivation that dieting so often brings about. Reduce portion sizes by just a third and you drop 500 calories or more from your daily intake losing about a pound of fat (3500 calories worth) a week without making any other changes. Although this is not the best way to eat healthily – for that you’d be better switching foods to include more nutrient-rich items, it does bring results without having to change too much at once.

While this is all very well for many people, there are some who struggle with this whole way of losing weight. That’s the group who crave a particular item or food group.

In this group, eating just small amount of the food they crave leads to eating a packetful no matter how much they want to eat in moderation. It may be the case with chocolate or other high-sugar foods and sometimes with salty snack type foods.

In this case it’s better to stay away from the food entirely for a short time while you learn to control portion sizes using other foods. Then, when you have a sense that you can control how much you eat with other foods, you’re losing weight and feeling good, reintroduce a small portion of the food you used to crave and see how you get on.

It can be a case of trial and error to get this right for your circumstances. We are all different and have different emotional and physical reactions to food. It takes longer for some than for others to be able to cope with a particular craving. Experiment with reintroducing the food after 3 or 4 weeks to start with – that’s generally enough to have seen good results from portion control with the rest of your meals and snacks. If it leads to eating too much then leave it for double that time before retrying. Some people have given up eating chocolate or ice cream forever because it’s almost like an addiction but this is unnecessary for most people once they get the moderation habit.

Author: Janice Elizabeth Small
Source: http://www.articlecity.com/articles/health/article_3890.shtml

High Fiber Diets

Can high-fiber diets really do all they claim to do? Studies have looked at the relationship between high-fiber diets and many diseases, including colon cancer, coronary heart disease and diabetes.

Proven benefits of a high-fiber diet include prevention and treatment of constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis. In addition, certain types of fiber help decrease blood cholesterol levels.

Dietary fiber comes from the portion of plants that is not digested by enzymes in the intestinal tract. Part of it, however, may be metabolized by bacteria in the lower gut. Different types of plants have varying amounts and kinds of fiber, including pectin, gum, mucilage, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin.

Pectin and gum are water-soluble fibers found inside plant cells. They slow the passage of food through the intestines but do nothing to increase fecal bulk. Beans, oat bran, fruit and vegetables contain soluble fiber.

In contrast, fibers in cell walls are water insoluble. These include cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Such fibers increase fecal bulk and speed up the passage of food through the digestive tract.

Wheat bran and whole grains contain the most insoluble fiber, but vegetables and beans also are good sources.Sometimes there is confusion as to the difference between crude fiber and dietary fiber. Both are determined by a laboratory analysis, but crude fiber is only one-seventh to one-half of total dietary fiber.

Insoluble fiber binds water, making stools softer and bulkier. Therefore, fiber, especially that found in whole grain products, is helpful in the treatment and prevention of constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis.

Diverticula are pouches of the intestinal wall that can become inflamed and painful.It is now known that a high-fiber diet gives better results once the inflammation has subsided.

Some types of fiber, however, appear to have a greater effect than others. The fiber found in rolled oats is more effective in lowering blood cholesterol levels than the fiber found in wheat. Pectin has a similar effect in that it, too, can lower the amount of cholesterol in the blood.

High-fiber diets may be useful for people who wish to lose weight. Fiber itself has no calories, yet provides a “full” feeling because of its water-absorbing ability. For example, an apple is more filling than a half cup of apple juice that contains about the same calories.

Foods high in fiber often require more chewing, so a person is unable to eat a large number of calories in a short amount of time. Dietary fiber is found only in plant foods: fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains. Meat, milk and eggs do not contain fiber.

The form of food may or may not affect its fiber content. Canned and frozen fruits and vegetables contain just as much fiber as raw ones. Other types of processing, though, may reduce fiber content. Drying and crushing, for example, destroy the water-holding qualities of fiber.

The removal of seeds, peels or hulls also reduces fiber content. Whole tomatoes have more fiber than peeled tomatoes, which have more than tomato juice. Likewise, whole wheat bread contains more fiber than white bread.

Fiber supplements are sold in a variety of forms from bran tablets to purified cellulose. Many laxatives sold as stool softeners actually are fiber supplements. Fiber’s role in the diet is still being investigated.

It appears that the various types of fiber have different roles in the body. For these reasons, avoid fiber supplements. Instead, eat a variety of fiber-rich foods.

This is the best way to receive the maximum benefits from each type of fiber present in foods, and obtain necessary nutrients.

Dietary Fiber – For Diabetes, Heart and General Health

Most people understand the importance of dietary fiber in their diet. Much has been said about its importance in heart health, diabetes, cancer prevention, and even weight control.

What is less well understood is how different types of fiber effect the body. Some provide fecal bulk, some are absorbed more quickly into the blood stream than others, and thus raise blood sugar levels more quickly, and yet others provide benefits to the heart.

Thus, despite the apparent simplicity, fiber is a complex topic. And whilst all types of fiber are important, if you are looking at preventing or managing specific conditions, its not enough to just look at the total dietary fiber as written on food packaging.

Dietary fiber is broadly classified into soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber is fermented in the colon, and plays a role in slowing the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. It also encourages the growth of the ‘friendly’ bacteria that help break down bile, and are involved in the creation of B vitamins like folic acid, niacin, and pyridoxine.

Insoluble fiber, on the other hand, acts a bit like an intestinal broom. It provides bulk to the stools, and makes sure they pass through easily and quickly. This is the type of fiber that keeps you ‘regular’, not insoluble fiber.

Insoluble fiber does provide a feeling of fullness, however. This makes it great for weight loss and controlling hunger. It also keeps blood sugar levels more stable, although research into the rate at which carbohydrates enter the bloodstream have found there to be some significant differences within the foods that make up the fiber group. Dietary fiber can thus be rated by its Glycemic Index, which effectively ranks fiber foods with each other on a relative scale.

The idea is to try and include more low gylcemic index foods. Foods with a high glycemic index cause blood sugar levels to spike, providing too much energy to the blood in the form of carbohydrates, which in turn sets off the body’s sugar controlling hormone – insulin. You thus get a ‘high’ followed by a sudden drop. This in turn leads the body to want more carbohydrates to balance itself again, leading to cravings and overeating, as well as tiredness and moodiness.

Low glycemic index foods include lentils, chickpeas, baked beans, fruit loaf, salmon sushi, barley, milk, low fat custard, soy milk, yoghurt (not diet yoghurt), apples, strawberries, grapes, spaghetti, peas, carrots, fructose, strawberry jam, and chocolate milk.

Moderate glycemic index foods include pea soup, rye bread, porridge, muesli, ice cream, bananas, pineapple, kiwi fruit, new potatoes, beetroot, white sugar, honey, and mars bars.

High glycemic index foods include broad beans, bagels, white bread, brown rice, watermelon, udon noodles, desiree, pontiac and sebago potatoes, and glucose.

We need both soluble and insoluble fiber, however. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that in a group of 6000 French men and women, those with the highest levels of soluble and insoluble fiber in their diet had a lower risk of being overweight, a lower risk of having blood pressure problems, cholesterol problems, and they had better levels of triacylglycerols and homocysteine. The last two are measure3 of heart health.

Fiber from cereals was linked to lower body fat, lower blood pressure, and lower levels of homocysteine. Those with a higher intake of vegetables, also a source of fiber, had lower blood pressure and lower homocysteine levels. Fiber from fresh fruit was associated with a lower waist to hip ratio (good news for dieters!), and lower blood pressure. And fiber from dried fruit, nuts, and seeds (like sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds) was also linked to a lower waist to hip ratio, lower body fat, and a better fasting glucose concentration. Fasting glucose relates to having a steady level of glucose between meals. If it dips too low, we crave things, often sweets.

Fiber has another interesting benefit. In people with type 2 diabetes, it has been found to lower the levels of ‘bad’ cholesterol, and increase the levels of ‘good’ cholesterol. It has already been established that fiber supplements will lower the levels of bad cholesterol in people, whether they have diabetes or not. But this new study found that fiber supplements also decreased the reabsorption of cholesterol from meals.

To get this benefit, it is important to time taking the fiber supplement in synch with meals. The study participants took a fiber supplement drink before mealtimes, and this ensured that the fiber was in the intestines when the meal was being eaten. The people in the study participated for 90 days and their average age was 59 years old.

References:
1. Australian Healthy Food, November 2005
2. nutraingredients.com/news/ng.asp?id=64759
3. nutraingredients.com/news/ng.asp?id=57887
4. nutraingredients.com/news/ng.asp?id=64462
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